Carnegie Mellon University

IDeATe

Integrative Design, Arts, and Technology

Portal Courses

15-104 Introduction to Computing for Creative Practice

An introduction to fundamental computing principles and programming techniques for creative cultural practices, with special consideration to applications in music, design and the visual arts. Intended for students with little to no prior programming experience, the course develops skills and understanding of text-based programming in a procedural style, including idioms of sequencing, selection, iteration, and recursion. Topics include data organization (arrays, files, trees), interfaces and abstraction (modular software design, using sensor data and software libraries), basic algorithms (searching and sorting), and computational principles (randomness, concurrency, complexity). Intended for students following an IDeATe concentration or minor who have not taken 15-112.

49-313 Designing for the Internet of Things

Thermostats, locks, power sockets, and lights are all being imbued with "smarts" making them increasingly aware and responsive to their environment and users. This course will chart the emergence of the now "connected world" to explore the possibilities for future products and connected spaces. This introductory, hands-on course invites students to creating connected products without any knowledge of programming, electronics or systems. Students will be introduced to interactive connected technologies through a series of hands on exercises, collaborative projects, in depth discussions, and instructor led tutorials. Topics explored will include awareness, real time sensing and communication, embedded intelligence, and designing experiences for the internet of things. By the end of this course, students will be familiar with the core skills, the considerations involved and design process required to build a connected system. Students will also apply this learning in collaborative groups to realize a prototype-connected product. This course is intended for MII-PS students; all other students by permission of the instructor.

Spring 2017 instructor: Eric Brockmeyer

Programs: Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Intelligent Environments

Offered by: Integrated Innovation Institute

62-478 digiTOOL

This IDeATe-affiliated course serves as an introduction to the fundamental concepts, processes, and procedures to utilize digital and traditional equipment within the IDeATe@Hunt Library facilities. After completion, participating students should leave with a thorough understanding of laser cutting/engraving, 3D printing, CNC routing, and traditional woodworking equipment/processes; and how to operate in a safe, responsible, and efficient manner. This comprehension and experience proves useful for all creative disciplines, and participants are certified for future fabrication equipment access.

Programs: Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Media Design, Physical Computing

Offered by: College of Fine Arts

70-421 Entrepreneurship for Computer Scientists

This course is primarily for non-business school students; it includes most of Introduction to Entrepreneurship (70-415), assumes no background courses in business and involves additional sessions for core business concepts. Students with majors in science, technology, engineering or computer science are exposed to fundamental concepts and issues in innovation, business and entrepreneurship. Students can expect to gain a basic understanding of functional areas such as finance, funding, marketing, sales and management. Student Status: Sophomore year or higher.

Fall 2016 instructor: William Kaigler

Program: Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Offered by: Tepper School of Business

70-414 Entrepreneurship for Engineers

This introductory course in entrepreneurship primarily targets non-business students and assumes no background in business. Students majoring in science, computer science, engineering, the humanities or the arts are exposed to fundamental concepts and issues around innovation and entrepreneurship. The course provides a foundation for starting a new venture and innovating new technologies and products within existing organizations. Topics covered will include: identifying a business opportunity, building a team, finance, equity investment, managing risk, market understanding, and competitive advantage. Emphasis will be on team projects, including developing an investor pitch for an original idea.

Fall 2016 instructor: Robert Daley, David Mawhinney

Program: Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Offered by: Tepper School of Business

70-420 Entrepreneurship for Scientists

Entrepreneurship for Scientists is an introductory course in entrepreneurship. The course primarily targets non-business students and assumes no background in business. Students majoring in science, computer science, engineering, the humanities or the arts are exposed to fundamental concepts and issues around innovation and entrepreneurship. The course provides a foundation for starting a new venture and innovating new technologies and products within existing organizations. Topics covered will include: identifying a business opportunity, building a team, finance, equity investment, managing risk, market understanding, and competitive advantage. Emphasis will be on team projects, including developing an investor pitch for an original idea.

Fall 2016 instructors: Robert Daley, David Mawhinney

Program: Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Offered by: Tepper School of Business

70-425 Entrepreneurship for the Creative Industries

This is an introductory course designed primarily for undergraduates in the College of Fine Arts who want to create new businesses, products, services, or thriving careers as independent artists. Students can expect to develop an entrepreneurial mindset, learn how creative firms and industries are structured, and build practical skills for finding, evaluating and putting entrepreneurial opportunities into action. We will analyze real world examples, for-profit and not-for-profit, from film, art, architecture, fashion, music, media, theater, retail, and design. The class will explore the core functional areas critical to building entrepreneurial entities, including teams, ideation, marketing and sales, financial analysis, and funding. Interdisciplinary teams will generate ideas and explore their potential as viable businesses or sustainable not-for-profits. Lectures, guest speakers, case studies, and exercises will also be integrated.

Spring 2016 instructor: Tim Cunningham

Program: Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Offered by: Tepper School of Business

70-395 Funding Entrepreneurial Ventures

So you want to do a startup and you know that you need funding. There are multiple ways to fund a new venture: bootstrapping, economic development, angels, venture capitalists. The question is what are these funders looking for in an early stage investment? What is important to them? How do they decide which companies to invest in and which not? This class looks at funding from the funder's point of view and provides the student with a framework of the investment process: investment criteria, sourcing, selection, due diligence, deal structure, valuation, post investment involvement. Real companies seeking funding are used for the final project in which students will be expected, as investment teams, to make investment decisions and convince their fellow investors (the class) to join them (or not). This is a highly interactive and project class. There will be multiple guest speakers. Prerequisites: Students are highly encouraged to take any of the introductory entrepreneurship classes offered in various schools and departments. While no financial background is required, this class will not cover the basics of entrepreneurship from the entrepreneur's perspective, but will be looking from the investor point of view.

Fall 2016 instructor: Stephen Bollinger

Program: Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Offered by: Tepper School of Business

70-100 Global Business

This course examines the fundamental issues in the development of new markets for products and services globally. It provides a foundation for understanding the functional areas of business and how they contribute to management of a firm. Students use this foundation knowledge to analyze cases and complete projects in order to gain an understanding of some of the key issues affecting a wide range of the most important global industries. First-year students also can gain a better understanding the vast array of career possibilities available to those who study business. PLEASE NOTE: this course replaces 70-101 (Introduction to Business Management) and will count toward the business minor. Sections A and B are reserved for first-year business majors only. Sections C and D are for non-business majors.

Fall 2016 instructors: Milton Cofield, David Lamont

Program: Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Offered by: Tepper School of Business

51-236 Information Design

This undergraduate IDeATe design course focuses on teaching a basic visual design process from start to finish. You will work individually and in teams to gain proficiency in applying specific design methods to information design challenges at each stage of the design process.In IDeATe Information Design you will: perform exercises and activities to practice what you learn, attend to lectures to gain new information/perspectives, engage in projects to learn through making, conduct readings to balance theory and practice, participate in critiques to verbalize your views and consider alternate perspectives, join in discussions to develop shared understanding, give presentations to communicate your thinking, complete tutorials and learn software for additional insight. These activities will lead to you being able to: describe the importance of context and audience to design decisions to set the stage for creating work that addresses the people that it serves, frame a problem to be solved to identify challenges that require design improvements, synthesize information collected in project framing to establish a logical direction for your design approach, ideate a range of concepts to consider various ways of addressing the task at hand, iterate select concepts through low to high fidelity prototyping to determine which concepts hold the most merit, visualize your ideas to communicate concepts clearly and aid learning and understanding of information, evaluate concepts in progress to identify areas that could use improvement, present and argue design solutions to strengthen the description and validation of your work.

Spring 2015 instructor: Michael Mages

Program: Media Design

Offered by: Design

49-300 Integrated Product Conceptualization

The Integrated Product Conceptualization course focuses on introducing students to some of the thinking, basic skills and methods used by industrial design, engineering, and business to generate new consumer product proposals within integrated teams. Teams will progress through three phases 1) identifying opportunities for new products or services, 2) understanding those opportunities through stakeholder research, value opportunity analysis, and competitive landscape assessment, then selecting one of which to focus, 3) conceptualizing the opportunity with the goal of meeting the value proposition. This course will combine lecture and studio activities including the generation of 2D visual representation skills and 3D low-fidelity physical modeling in support of course work. An important part of this course is a design project that is carried out by interdisciplinary teams. In order to effectively contribute to their team, each student should have experience or coursework in at least one of the following: design, the arts, engineering/technology, or business. This course is reserved for junior and senior level students. Freshmen and sophomores will be admitted as space allows and with instructor permission.

Fall 2016 instructor: Chris McComb

Program: Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Offered by: Integrated Innovation Institute

15-394 Intermediate Rapid Prototyping

This course covers additional topics in rapid prototyping beyond the content of 15-294 Rapid Prototyping Technologies. Example topics include mechanism design, procedural shape generation using Grasshopper, 3D scanning and mesh manipulation, and advanced SolidWorks concepts. The only prerequisite is basic familiarity with SolidWorks, which can be obtained via 15-294 Rapid Prototyping Technologies, from other CMU courses, or from online tutorials.

Spring 2017 instructor: Dave Touretzky

Program: Innovation and Entrepreneurship Media Design Physical Computing

Offered by: Computer Science

70-415 Introduction to Entrepreneurship

This course is designed primarily to provide an overview of entrepreneurship, develop an entrepreneurial frame of mind and learn the rudiments of how to differentiate an idea from an opportunity. Students come up with a business idea and explore its potential for becoming a viable business. They learn to do market research and experience first-hand the rewards and difficulties in dealing with people in the real world. They will meet entrepreneurs and business professionals as part of the course and learn how to make effective presentations - both written and oral. Other important aspects of the course include self-assessment to determine one's strengths and weaknesses, understanding the “magic” of leadership and gaining an entrepreneurial perspective on life.

Fall 2016 instructor: H. Jones

Program: Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Offered by: Tepper School of Business

70-416 New Venture Creation

This course exposes students to the nuances of financing new ventures, getting them started legally and marketing their products or services. Students pull together all the ideas and information from different functional aspects of their projects into coherent and persuasive mini-business plans that serve as roadmaps for building their businesses; and useful instruments to find sufficient financing for the new ventures, so that they can convince the outside world that these opportunities are viable, with substantial potential for success.

Spring 2016 instructor: David Mawhinney

Program: Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Offered by: Tepper School of Business

73-100 Principles of Economics

Literally, an introduction to economic principles, the goal of this course is to give students an understanding as to what constitutes good "economic thinking". This thought process is grounded in the construction and use of economics models. Drawing on issues in both microeconomics and macroeconomics, fundamental principles are shown to transcend particular examples and allow the field to be seen as a coherent, unified whole. (Lecture, 2 hours; Recitation, 1 hour).

Program: Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Offered by: Tepper School of Business

51-312 Products in Systems: ID IV

Integrative Product Design Studio is a studio course conducted in the School of Design. This course is a highly collaborative team-based project course that requires the use of participatory research methods, creative thinking processes, and various visualization methods to develop and design new physical product systems.

The course requires the application of basic behavioral research methods, ability to conduct first-person research, and analysis and conversion of this information into visual 2D and 3D visualizations. Public presentation and critique of visual and verbal iterations are a significant part of the studio structure and learning process.

Proficiency in visualization of your abstract ideas through analog and digital methods is required to effectively work on a design team: freehand sketching, physical 3D prototyping, 2D graphic software, 3D modeling software, and/or processing/programming visualization.

Spring 2016 instructor: Wayne Chung

Program: Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Offered by: Design

15-294 Rapid Prototyping Technologies

This mini-course introduces students to rapid prototyping technologies with a focus on laser cutting and 3D printing. The course has three components: 1) A survey of rapid prototyping and additive manufacturing technologies, the maker and open source movements, and societal impacts of these technologies; 2) An introduction to the computer science behind these technologies: CAD tools, file formats, slicing algorithms; 3) Hands-on experience with SolidWorks, laser cutting, and 3D printing, culminating in student projects (e.g. artistic creations, functional objects, replicas of famous calculating machines, etc.). Please note that there will be a usage/materials fee for this course.

Fall 2016 instructor: David Touretzky

Spring 2016 course website: 15-294 Rapid Prototyping Technologies

Program: Innovation and Entrepreneurship Media Design Physical Computing

Offered by: Computer Science

24-672 Special Topics in DIY Design and Fabrication

The traditional principles of mass production are being challenged by concepts of highly customized and personalized goods. A growing number of do-it-yourself (DIY) inventors, designers, makers, and entrepreneurs is accelerating this trend. This class offers students hands-on experiences of DIY product design and fabrication processes. Over the course of a semester, students work individually or in small groups to design a customized and personalized product of their own and build it using various DIY fabrication methods, including 3D laser scanning, 3D printing, laser cutting, vacuum forming, etc. Students develop multiple prototypes throughout the semester, iterating and refining their design.

Fall 2015 instructor: Kenji Shimada

Program: Innovation and Entrepreneurship Media Design Physical Computing

Offered by: College of Engineering

76-285 Team Communication

This mini will introduce you to research and theory on how to create effective teams. In it, you will learn: - leadership strategies for managing projects and getting everyone to contribute to their best capacity - interpersonal skills for negotiating team conflict - communication strategies for working with individuals from very different professional and cultural backgrounds. - techniques for fostering trust and inspiring team innovation and creativity - how to use technology to manage teams that are geographically separated Professor Joanna Wolfe has been studying student and professional technical teams for fifteen years and is the author of multiple books and award-winning articles on team communication. This course will be hands-on with assigned readings and video cases that are discussed in class with plenty of opportunities to role-play different communication strategies and techniques.

Program: Animation & Special Effects Game Design Innovation and Entrepreneurship Intelligent Environments Learning Media Media Design Physical Computing Sound Design

Offered by: English